Upaya Zen Center podcasts

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Upaya Zen CenterUpaya Zen Center
A Santa Fe, NM Zen center and community with retreats, daily meditation, weekly Dharma talks on Buddhist teachings
Updated: 4 hours 23 min ago

Joan Halifax: Exploring Questions on Love and Compassion

February 20, 2017 - 4:57am

Episode Description: Roshi Joan Halifax begins the talk with an arresting statement: “Our world is burning.” She recounts her recent travels, and a talk she gave at a children’s hospital.  Roshi quotes Rilke, “Love and death are the great gifts that are given to us; mostly they are passed on unopened.” Our work is to open those gifts, she tells us. She also shares from her recent visit with her teacher, Roshi Bernie Glassman, and his answer to the question, “What is love?” “If someone is thirsty, find them something to drink.” She says, “Awakening is based on passion for the world: to serve the world, to meet the world completely, to end suffering in every way possible.” She ends by reading the invocation she has prepared to give next week at the New Mexico House of Representatives.

To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

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Roshi Joan Halifax, PhD
Abbot

Joan Halifax Roshi is a Buddhist teacher, Zen...
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John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 5B – last)

February 19, 2017 - 9:54pm

Episode Description: (This part is a continuation from Part 5A) John Dunne talks about how our apprehensions of objects in the world are ultimately non-dual, even though duality is encoded into our day to day experience. He also covers the concept of extended cognition, which tells us that we are not autonomous beings with our own distinct ideas. “Changing our minds and the world has to be a communal enterprise,” he says. There is also discussion of structural violence, which Dunne posits is unintentional discrimination against minorities.  Understanding that people who act unskillfully are deluded, rather than evil, is an important aspect of compassion.

To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Donate $25 Here

For Series description, please visit Part 1.

To access the entire series, please click on the link below:
Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

John Dunne, PhD

John Dunne (PhD 1999, Harvard University) is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he holds the Distinguished Chair in Contemplative Humanities, a newly endowed position created...
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John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 5A)

February 19, 2017 - 9:30pm

Episode Description: John Dunne talks about how our apprehensions of objects in the world are ultimately non-dual, even though duality is encoded into our day to day experience. He also covers the concept of extended cognition, which tells us that we are not autonomous beings with our own distinct ideas. “Changing our minds and the world has to be a communal enterprise,” he says. There is also discussion of structural violence, which Dunne posits is unintentional discrimination against minorities.  Understanding that people who act unskillfully are deluded, rather than evil, is an important aspect of compassion. This session concludes in Part 5B.

To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Donate $25 Here

For Series description, please visit Part 1.

To access the entire series, please click on the link below:
Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

John Dunne, PhD

John Dunne (PhD 1999, Harvard University) is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he holds the Distinguished Chair in Contemplative Humanities, a newly endowed position created...
More

John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 4)

February 19, 2017 - 4:00pm

Episode Description: John Dunne gives some advice to the program participants on practicing between sessions. He advises them to try to notice the concepts and beliefs they are carrying with them, and how these influence their interactions and relationships. “What are my hopes and fears?” He implores us to ask ourselves. Dunne addresses the concern that the mindfulness movement may be leading Western Buddhism to become an “opiate of the elite.” He also tells a story as told to him by Bob Thurman about the nature of samsara.

To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Donate $25 Here

For Series description, please visit Part 1.

To access the entire series, please click on the link below:
Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

John Dunne, PhD

John Dunne (PhD 1999, Harvard University) is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he holds the Distinguished Chair in Contemplative Humanities, a newly endowed position created...
More

John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 3B)

February 19, 2017 - 10:00am

Episode Description: (This part is a continuation from Part 3A) John Dunne takes the audience through the “neither one nor many” argument employed in Tibetan Buddhism, which deals with abstraction. How is it that we decide an object we see fits the category “cup,” for example? We try to create “one” ideal, such as “cup,” from the sensory data presented to us that represents many cups. Dunne discusses how this is sometimes problematic, because we have to suppress the differences we see in order to fit things in to categories. Nonetheless, we need this capacity to function in the world, and Dunne discusses the role that intersubjectivity (the concepts we all share) plays in our lives.

To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Donate $25 Here

For Series description, please visit Part 1.

To access the entire series, please click on the link below:
Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

John Dunne, PhD

John Dunne (PhD 1999, Harvard University) is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he holds the Distinguished Chair in Contemplative Humanities, a newly endowed position created...
More

John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 3A)

February 19, 2017 - 9:30am

Episode Description: John Dunne takes the audience through the “neither one nor many” argument employed in Tibetan Buddhism, which deals with abstraction. How is it that we decide an object we see fits the category “cup,” for example? We try to create “one” ideal, such as “cup,” from the sensory data presented to us that represents many cups. Dunne discusses how this is sometimes problematic, because we have to suppress the differences we see in order to fit things in to categories. Nonetheless, we need this capacity to function in the world, and Dunne discusses the role that intersubjectivity (the concepts we all share) plays in our lives. This session concludes in Part 3B.

To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Donate $25 Here

For Series description, please visit Part 1.

To access the entire series, please click on the link below:
Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

John Dunne, PhD

John Dunne (PhD 1999, Harvard University) is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he holds the Distinguished Chair in Contemplative Humanities, a newly endowed position created...
More

John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 2B)

February 18, 2017 - 10:26am

Episode Description: In this session (which is a continuation from Part 2A), John Dunne discusses how our minds synthesize the world we live in, based on the raw information received by our senses. This is important because how we create the world we live in is influenced by our beliefs, which dictate what things we choose to pay attention to, and how we interpret them. We never see objects in the world, only the data presented to us by our senses, which is then interpreted by our minds. Dunne then contrasts the Western notion of morality and justice, in which specific moral judgements are attached to everything, with a Buddhist morality in which we all share responsibility for the outcome of our actions.

To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Donate $25 Here

For Series description, please visit Part 1.

To access the entire series, please click on the link below:
Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

John Dunne, PhD

John Dunne (PhD 1999, Harvard University) is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he holds the Distinguished Chair in Contemplative Humanities, a newly endowed position created...
More

John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 2A)

February 18, 2017 - 10:00am

Episode Description: In this session, John Dunne discusses how our minds synthesize the world we live in, based on the raw information received by our senses. This is important because how we create the world we live in is influenced by our beliefs, which dictate what things we choose to pay attention to, and how we interpret them. We never see objects in the world, only the data presented to us by our senses, which is then interpreted by our minds. Dunne then contrasts the Western notion of morality and justice, in which specific moral judgements are attached to everything, with a Buddhist morality in which we all share responsibility for the outcome of our actions. This session concludes in Part 2B.

To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Donate $25 Here

For Series description, please visit Part 1.

To access the entire series, please click on the link below:
Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

John Dunne, PhD

John Dunne (PhD 1999, Harvard University) is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he holds the Distinguished Chair in Contemplative Humanities, a newly endowed position created...
More

John Dunne: Belief, Unbelief and Motivation: Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight (Part 1)

February 17, 2017 - 7:58pm

Series Description: What is the role that beliefs play in Buddhist practice, and how are beliefs related to our motivations? For all styles of Buddhist practice, transforming our deeply ingrained mental and behavioral habits requires us to recognize our cherished illusions, and from the nondual perspective, it is famously said that a deep transformation requires “abandoning all beliefs.” Does this mean that we do not believe anything at all? And how can we cultivate compassion under those circumstances? In this weekend of conversation and practice, we explore these questions from the standpoint of Buddhist philosophy and practice, along with a few empirical insights about behavior change from cognitive science

Episode Description: John Dunne begins the evening session with a guided meditation based on the brahmavih?ras. He then spends the rest of the first session of the program by providing overviews of his academic and religious backgrounds, as well as the material he hopes to cover over the course of the weekend. He discusses different Mahayana metaphysical views, the importance of examining the teachings for oneself, rather than accepting them on faith, as well as how we can manifest compassion by understanding the deluded nature we have in common with others.

To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Donate $25 Here

To access the entire series, please click on the link below:
Integrating Meditation, Compassion and Insight Series

John Dunne, PhD

John Dunne (PhD 1999, Harvard University) is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he holds the Distinguished Chair in Contemplative Humanities, a newly endowed position created...
More

John Dunne: Blowin’ in the Wind…but not Breaking: The Practice of Equanimity

February 13, 2017 - 4:00am

Episode Description: John Dunne begins with an examination of the relationship between equanimity and wisdom. He describes equanimity as a kind of “intelligent inaction,” and discusses how craving and aversion pull our minds out of balance. Instead of allowing this to happen, we should try to see cravings and aversions as characterizing only one possible model of consciousness. Dunne then turns to compassion, and talks about how we see the world in terms of people who are “good” and “bad,” people who are “in our group,” and people who aren’t. If we can pay attention to our shared goals, rather then our differences, we have the opportunity to develop authentic compassion for everyone. “You can trust everybody,” Dunne says, “in the sense that everybody wants to be happy, and nobody wants to suffer.”

To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Donate $25 Here

John Dunne, PhD

John Dunne (PhD 1999, Harvard University) is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he holds the Distinguished Chair in Contemplative Humanities, a newly endowed position created...
More

Dolpo Tulku Rinpoche: Taking Illness as a Path of Dharma

February 6, 2017 - 4:00am
Episode Description: Dolpo Rinpoche tells the community that certain spiritual practices can make us too sensitive and narrow, and thus unable to cope with difficult aspects of our lives. He proceeds to outline a seven-point antidote to this condition. Among the points he covers are the conceptualization of illness and misfortune as a karmic outcome, the importance of renunciation, the inner strength of compassion, and the illusory nature of both suffering and happiness. With engaging precision and humorous anecdotes, Rinpoche provides an outline for a robust and dynamic practice. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Dolpo Tulku Rinpoche: When is a good time to practice Dharma?

January 30, 2017 - 4:00am
Episode Description: Dolpo Rinpoche begins by thanking everyone who has made it possible for him to travel to the United States, in order to visit Upaya and improve his English. He then explores the concept of Dharma, tracing how the Buddhist meaning of the term arose from the Hindu one. Practicing Dharma in the Buddhist sense means manifesting our body, speech, and mind in a positive way. The tradition or method that is used to accomplish this is irrelevant; what is important is the intention behind one’s actions. Rinpoche suggests that the work day is an especially important time to pay attention to our emotions and our intentions. Finally, he invokes the tumultuous nature of our present time—developing “immeasurable compassion” is more important than ever. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Joshin Brian Byrnes & Irene Kaigetsu Bakker & Genzan Quennell: Appreciate Your Life

January 24, 2017 - 4:00pm
Episode Description: Sensei Kaigetsu congratulates the new senseis, Sensei Joshin and Sensei Genzan, and discusses Dharma transmission. Sensei Joshin extends a warm welcome to a group of new residents. He then spends some time examining Maezumi Roshi’s injunction to “appreciate your life,” asking us, “have we stopped appreciating our lives?” “We beat ourselves up for our unhappiness,” he says, describing the way all of us magnify our suffering. “When you consider the amount of things to make an event happen, says Sensei Genzan, “the idea that anything else could be happening is absurd. Think of all the people and things that helped you get here. All of that comes together in gassho.” To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Joshin Brian Byrnes & Genzan Quennell: A Different Kind of Radical

January 23, 2017 - 4:00am
Episode Description: Sensei Joshin Byrnes begins by acknowledging that the residents and guests are entering a sesshin devoted to the Ox Herding Pictures, during what promises to be a very eventful week, with both the presidential inauguration and global women’s marches taking place. Our task is to see our silence during this time as a "radical act”-- where radical means "going to the root”-- and to perceive what lies beneath the reactivity at the surface of our minds. Sensei Genzan Quennell tells us this week that he is "sitting at the intersection of hope and love." He shares a personal story about the power of nonviolence, before acknowledging the passage of the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The reason for his optimism is something Dr. King understood: The connection between militarism, materialism, civil rights, and women's rights. "Pull on any one of them, and the whole thing comes undone." To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Joshin Brian Byrnes & Genzan Quennell: A Mind Gentle and Forbearing

January 16, 2017 - 4:00am
Episode Description: Sensei Joshin Byrnes begins by thanking the sangha for its support during the time that he and Sensei Genzan Quennell were preparing to receive Dharma Transmission from Roshi Joan. He then discusses the “power of the robe,” first by acknowledging the negative aspects of religious authority. He then turns his attention to “the all encompassing robe of liberation.” Rather than a piece of cloth, this refers to “a mind that is gentle and forbearing,” which is “the robe we wear both individually and collectively in our lives.” Sensei Genzan asks himself “how did I get here?” He speaks about the various debts of gratitude he owes, particularly to the women in his life that lead him to the dharma. The Senseis invite the sangha to join the residents at the Santa Fe Women’s March, which will take place the day after the presidential inauguration. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Joshin Brian Byrnes & Genzan Quennell: The Whole of the Spiritual Life

January 9, 2017 - 4:00am
Episode Description: Joshin Brian Byrnes and Genzan Quennell discuss the nature of friendship. Joshin begins by exploring the distinction that constitutes “spiritual” friendship. “Sometimes we offer our friends diamonds,” he says, “and sometimes we offer our friends lotuses.” He then shares an account of a conversation between Ananda and the Buddha, in which the Buddha tells his attendant that “the whole of the spiritual life is about friendship.” Genzan lists seven qualities which a worthwhile friend embodies. He also discusses his spiritual friendship with Joshin, and shares a teaching from Sesame Street. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund.

Joshin Brian Byrnes & Genzan Quennell: Silent Illumination 2016 (Part 2 of 2)

January 2, 2017 - 4:00am
Episode Description: Genzan Quennell shares a story about a walk that the Hindu god Indra took with the Buddha.  His takeaway from the story is that “we can cease wandering at any moment and find refuge.”  In order to do this, we have to let go of our ideas: “When we are completely empty-handed, then we can see the abundance.”  Joshin Byrnes contemplates how much of our lives are spent crossing thresholds, going from place to place.  “We look far and wide for the answer,” he says, “and sometimes it is much, much closer than we think.”  He then shares a parable about a young student and his search for the “true monastery.” To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. For Series Description please visit Part 1 of 2.

Joshin Brian Byrnes & Genzan Quennell: Silent Illumination 2016 (Part 1 of 2)

December 26, 2016 - 4:00am
Series Description: In this pair of talks, Joshin Brian Byrnes and Genzan Quennell explore the themes of the text Cultivating the Boundless Field. In the context of a sesshin, we are able to go deeper into the text and actualize the field of practice that Honghzhi's text describes. Episode Description: Joshin Brian Byrnes tells us that each day of sesshin brings a "new flavor." He remarks on an error that was made the day prior during a meal, and wonders how we can be nourished by everything we encounter in the course of our practice--even by an empty bowl. The answer that Hongzu provides is that we should bring the qualities of wonder and wandering to everything that we encounter. Genzan Quennell remarks on changes that Buddhism has encountered, such as creation of the monastery system in China and its incorporation into Western culture through the Beat generation.  He quotes Muso Soseki, "When there is no place you have decided to call your own, then no matter where you are, you are always home." To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. Click here for Part 2 of 2.

John Dunne: Bodhidharma Through Himalayan Eyes (Part 8 – last)

December 25, 2016 - 9:00pm
Episode Description: John Dunne introduces a practice which he refers to as "the great equanimity." All things "taste the same," he tells us, and he recommends experimenting in moments when we are receiving either praise or blame. He also talks about Jon Kabat-Zinn's work with individuals suffering from chronic pain, which worked to change the patient's relationship to pain, rather than trying to eliminate pain itself. We can view our own pain this way, and accept that while we aren't going to get rid of it, we can eliminate the dualistic grasping which magnifies our suffering. Finally, he introduces a Shamatha practice in which the practitioner uses her own awareness as the object of meditation. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. To access the entire series, please click on the link below: Bodhidharma Through Himalayan Eyes Series For Series description, please visit Part 1.

John Dunne: Bodhidharma Through Himalayan Eyes (Part 7)

December 25, 2016 - 3:00pm
Episode Description: John Dunne discusses the meaning of "taking refuge" and how it connects us with our lineage and our innate capacity for awakening.  While we should cherish our connection to the ancestors, we should also not fear change and be aware that Buddhism has always been a "hybrid," as it has incorporated itself into cultures and merged with other religions.  Dunne and the audience discuss the cultural baggage that comes with identifying with a religious tradition in the west. To help keep these podcasts freely available, we hope you will consider making a suggested donation of $25 to our Dharma Podcast Fund. To access the entire series, please click on the link below: Bodhidharma Through Himalayan Eyes Series For Series description, please visit Part 1.