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Buddhism
A reddit for all kinds of Buddhist teachings
Updated: 31 min 42 sec ago

A theravadan perspective on "To eat or not to eat meat" by Bhikkhu Dhammika.

November 20, 2014 - 6:43am

Basically, Bhikkhu Dhammika goes over some of the most common arguments why meat-eating is okay among laity (And sangha) and suggests it's time for a reconsideration of those (potentially faulty) arguments.

While it's clearly an open question in the vinaya, Bhikkhu Dhammika here gives great contextual and historical reasoning to break apart arguments I hear being parroted on this subreddit almost verbatim on a regular basis.

An excerpt (bolding my own):

In a very important discourse in the Anguttara Nikaya the Buddha praises those who care about others as much as they care about themselves. He says, “There are these four types of people found in the world. What four? He who is concerned with neither his own good nor the good of others, he who is concerned with the good of others but not his own, he who is concerned with his own good but not the good of others and he who is concerned with both his own good and the good of others - and of these four he who is concerned with his own good and the good of others is the chief, the best, the topmost, the highest, the supreme.” (A.II,94). And a little further along the Buddha asks the question, “And how is one concerned with both his own good and the good of others?” In part of the answer to this question he answers, ‘He does not kill or encourage others to kill.” (A.II,99). We saw before that there is a casual link between killing animals and purchasing their meat. Quite simply, slaughter houses would not slaughter animals and butchers and supermarkets would not stock meat if people did not buy it. Therefore, when we purchase meat or even eat it when it is served to us, we are encouraging killing, and thus not acting out of concern for others, as the Buddha asked us to do.

This is among many other conclusions he arrives at:

http://www.theravada-dhamma.org/pdf/Bhikkhu_Dhammika-To-Eat-Or-Not-To-Eat-Meat.pdf

submitted by 10000Buddhas
[link] [73 comments]

My girlfriend is upset when I said I will practice Buddhism(former Christian)

November 20, 2014 - 3:38am

So today I told my girlfriend I will search for a temple so I can learn more about the practice of Buddhism, but she suddenly felt confused and she said she don't understand why would I go to other places when we have our own church. She said there are pastors that can also teach me about spirituality.

Honestly, I don't feel like sharing my problems/sins to anybody and in our church there's a group or a community and I'm not much of a social guy.

Obviously, she's not that open when it comes to religion unlike me. I feel hurt right now and don't know what to do cause she was the one who should support me on becoming a better man. I didn't know religion will be an issue in our relationship.

submitted by dreiohc
[link] [86 comments]

Because the nature within everything Is utterly pure without distinctions, It is the tatha?gata itself. This is the essence dwelling in all beings. -Maha?ya?nasu?tra?lam?ka?ra

November 20, 2014 - 2:54am

Because the nature within everything

Is utterly pure without distinctions,

It is the tatha?gata itself.

This is the essence dwelling in all beings.

-Maha?ya?nasu?tra?lam?ka?ra

submitted by cchandleriv
[link] [41 comments]

Looking for people who have done Buddhist retreats in a foreign country

November 20, 2014 - 12:54am

Hi I'm currently doing research with regards to spiritual tourism and I'm looking for some people who may have done Buddhist retreats to learn a little more on your experiences. I'm considering doing something similar in the future as well and any information will great!

Edit: Have sent all you guys a private message. Again thanks so much!!

submitted by ceddynator
[link] [4 comments]

Only One Sky

November 19, 2014 - 10:34pm

Has anyone read this book? Thoughts? I loved it so much I lent it to a friend before I was half way done.

Also! Does anyone have any similar books to this, or ones that really made you open up?

^_^ submitted by hotbaby420
[link] [1 comment]

The Buddha Explains Right Speech to Prince Abhaya

November 19, 2014 - 8:10pm

1] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial (or: not connected with the goal), unendearing & disagreeable to others, he does not say them.

[2] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, unendearing & disagreeable to others, he does not say them.

[3] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, but unendearing & disagreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them.

[4] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial, but endearing & agreeable to others, he does not say them.

[5] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, but endearing & agreeable to others, he does not say them.

[6] In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, and endearing & agreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them. Why is that? Because the Tathagata has sympathy for living beings."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.058.than.html

submitted by veksone
[link] [8 comments]

Need some perspective here

November 19, 2014 - 7:32pm

Slightly long-ish post sorry. I am 25 years of age. I have a life, parents for fam (not wife or kids, thankfully), job, etc., But, everything seems empty, with a lack of depth. I am just unhappy about how people want so many things around me and how they are suffering because of wanting so many things. I feel like I have been having this..."spiritual calling" of sorts.

So I have been doing a bit of reading a bit of Buddhism, paying more attention to the concepts to apply to life, and trying to ask myself the right questions about life and rebirth and karma etc., I visited this Buddhist society near my place. They house a few 100 monks and I found some kind of interest in that quietness and chants, lack of chaos and humdrum like in normal life. I have read something about living life as a monk. I understand there would be a lot of work to do if I go down that direction. But yet to experience it firsthand. So I might need to go back there and ask them what it is like, what I should know. And if I can spend some time there (not sure if my job will allow it) or something.

I like a simple life without anybody to bother me about what I am doing, and my bothering anyone. In fact, most of the stuff that others seem to want, I just don't have the ambition to want those "extras". Perhaps because I have got everything? I don't really know. That's one of the things I am questioning. I, in fact, seem to want lesser and lesser. I feel like I want to descend into bare necessities. But a little weird how less I can go. I want to try though :P

I am practising anapanasati meditation for about 15 minutes everyday basically, focussing on breath.

I need more advice on how to proceed with this unhappiness that I am feeling. I just feel there isn't any point to much of what I am doing apart from Meditation. Meditation gives me perspective and calm and I am also doing it because I want to look inwards and realize certain things. But otherwise, with job and family and stuff, its a dead end feeling. I have no interest in raising a family. I am just interested in exploring this spiritual side of myself.

So I am looking for maybe some advice/guidance on how to approach Buddhism and realize stuff considering the situation at hand.

PS: I just feel like I am holding onto this job simply because I earn something and parents around me. I don't see much of self interest.

submitted by fonyix
[link] [7 comments]

Buddhism at work

November 19, 2014 - 7:12pm

Hi everyone,

How do you stay ego-free at work yet still maintain respect and professionalism? At my work it feels like I have to be aggressive and compete with the others to get ahead, and it feels like I have to have a big ego to 'get my way', or else I am ignored and seen as unimportant. I am quiet and reserved by nature, and I try to be assertive in my work in my own way, but by trying to be selfless, I feel I am easily 'overtaken' and I have to respond by being just as aggressive, but that feels unnatural and drains me afterwards.

I don't know if it is just me being a conservative Asian woman working in a high energy male-dominated place, or what, but I have been struggling with this for a while.

submitted by terribleatkaraoke
[link] [4 comments]

Being a Buddhist marketing professional helps create a new set of consequences that might reverse or lessen some of the harm we have done.

November 19, 2014 - 7:10pm

My primary identity is that of Buddha, and I have just launched my second enterprise (the first sells tea) which is a digital marketing and social media solutions company. One of my focus areas has been right livelihood, and I am now trying to build it into my business, trying to help clients ask themselves why they want to sell instead of telling buyers why they should buy. Anybody else dealing with the same issues from a Buddhist perspective - I would really, really appreciate hearing about your experiences and understanding.

submitted by subhorup
[link] [5 comments]

Buddhism and Christianity are images of the same teachings. Christ is the Buddha!

November 19, 2014 - 5:28pm

"Enter through the narrow gate [enter into heaven, achieve enlightenment/liberation, enter into nonduality, emptiness, transcendental wisdom]. For wide is the gate and broad is the road [sins, the kleshas, poison] that leads to destruction [suffering, death, the repeated cycle, the infinite return], and many enter through it [samsara, hell]. But small is the gate [the mind] and narrow the road [the noble 8-fold path] that leads to life [nirvana, heaven], and only a few find it. [the enlightened beings, the buddhas, the angels]" -Matthew 7:13-14 or the Dharma?

It's all the same thing!

submitted by Atican
[link] [42 comments]

Former Christian (raised) and Atheist. Now looking at buddhism. What are the first steps to becoming a buddhist?

November 19, 2014 - 5:01pm

I'm highly interested in Buddhism so if anyone here can help me get started I'll be grateful :)

submitted by MrDoctorDostoyevsky
[link] [39 comments]

Tracing Back the Radiance

November 19, 2014 - 3:54pm

Buddhism and Taoism, can they coexist?

November 19, 2014 - 3:16pm

I apologize if this has been asked previously, I recently returned to this subreddit. I am interested in both practices.

submitted by martininkorea
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Simile of the Snake

November 19, 2014 - 1:53pm

Here, bhikkhus, some misguided men learn the Dhamma—discourses, stanzas, expositions, verses, exclamations, sayings, birth stories, marvels, and answers to questions—but having learned the Dhamma, they do not examine the meaning of those teachings with wisdom. Not examining the meaning of those teachings with wisdom, they do not gain a reflective acceptance of them. Instead they learn the Dhamma only for the sake of criticising others and for winning in debates, and they do not experience the good for the sake of which they learned the Dhamma. Those teachings, being wrongly grasped by them, conduce to their harm and suffering for a long time. Why is that? Because of the wrong grasp of those teachings.

“Suppose a man needing a snake, seeking a snake, wandering in search of a snake, saw a large snake and grasped its coils or its tail. It would turn back on him and bite his hand or his arm or one of his limbs, [134] and because of that he would come to death or deadly suffering. Why is that? Because of his wrong grasp of the snake. So too, here some misguided men learn the Dhamma … Why is that? Because of the wrong grasp of those teachings.

Alagadd?pama Sutta

submitted by oldmusic
[link] [5 comments]

Why you are or aren't vegetarian in your Buddhist practice?

November 19, 2014 - 11:17am

I was really interested in some of the responses we were getting in an earlier post that has since been deleted.

I am a Buddhist who eats meat, I had some periods of vegetarianism / fruititarianism that lasted around 8 years, but due to sickness picked meat back up again, and am re exploring as to whether or not I should readopt vegetarianism, because right now I feel pretty healthy and happy in my diet.

I would like this to be an open forum where we engage with eachother kindly, compassionately, and mindfully, and we should avoid attacking, sarcasm, or other things that might injure eachother.

I wasn't so stoked about how we handled the last thread, and thought we might be able to really give our honest views/practices without getting at eachother's throats.

submitted by -JoNeum42
[link] [154 comments]

The Ego on the Path (Thanissaro Bhikkhu) - "Actually, the Buddha's teachings contain all the elements of healthy ego functioning. Even the not-self teaching is treated by the Buddha as a type of healthy ego functioning."

November 19, 2014 - 10:51am

Sometimes you hear that the Buddha's teaching on not-self is a teaching on non-ego. This is actually a misunderstanding and it has two unfortunate consequences. The first is that, for those who like the idea of non-ego, it becomes an excuse for self-hatred and for the practice of spiritual bypassing. An example of spiritual bypassing is this: Suppose you have troubles in your life and you don't want to engage in the difficult business of trying to become more mature in dealing with others or negotiating the conflicting desires in your own mind. Instead, you simply go and meditate, you do prostrations, you do chanting, and you hope that those practices will magically make the problems in your life go away. This is called spiritual bypassing — an unskillful way of clinging to habits and practices. As you can imagine, it's not very healthy — and not very effective. People often come back from meditation retreats and they still have the same problems they had before.

The other problem in thinking that Buddhism teaches non-ego is that those who understand the healthy functions of the ego believe that Buddhism lacks a proper appreciation of these functions. They think that Buddhist teachings are incomplete and need help from Western psychology in order to become a complete training of the mind.

Actually, the Buddha's teachings contain all the elements of healthy ego functioning. Even the not-self teaching is treated by the Buddha as a type of healthy ego functioning.

Source

submitted by sanghika
[link] [43 comments]

"I Want Happiness" Disappearing Ink Mug [X-post from r/meditation]

November 19, 2014 - 10:41am

Hey guys - I posted this over at /r/meditation but thought I should post here too...!

I was thinking the other day how it would be nice to have a fun and friendly reminder to stay mindful throughout my work day. I immediately thought of two ideas for a disappearing ink mug.

The first is a *misquote from the Buddha:

A man said to the Buddha, “I want Happiness.” Buddha said, first remove “I”, that’s ego, then remove “want”, that’s desire. See now you are left with only Happiness.

I thought it would be great to have a mug which both "I" and "want" disappear with hot liquid, only leaving happiness :)

The second idea has to do with the illusion of self. Upon hot liquid, both the "illusion of self" disappears.

I was going to do a custom order for a few for myself and for gifts for friends, but quickly found out that the price would be outrageous.

So, I thought I could order them in bulk and see if others were interested.

If you are interested, please let me know/leave me your email. I whipped up a page where you can see the designs.

If you have any different ideas that you would like to see, I would love to hear them!

edit: I have changed the website and the post to reflect that it is actually a misquote. I still love the mindful sentiment, and hope you do too!

submitted by GreenMonkeys4Life
[link] [6 comments]

Buddha describes the eight worldly things we experience no matter what we do, and how we should deal with them.

November 19, 2014 - 9:34am

"Monks, these eight worldly conditions spin after the world, and the world spins after these eight worldly conditions. Which eight? Gain, loss, status, disgrace, censure, praise, pleasure, & pain. These are the eight worldly conditions that spin after the world, and the world spins after these eight worldly conditions.

"For an uninstructed run-of-the-mill person there arise gain, loss, status, disgrace, censure, praise, pleasure, & pain. For a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones there also arise gain, loss, status, disgrace, censure, praise, pleasure, & pain. So what difference, what distinction, what distinguishing factor is there between the well-instructed disciple of the noble ones and the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person?"

"For us, lord, the teachings have the Blessed One as their root, their guide, & their arbitrator. It would be good if the Blessed One himself would explicate the meaning of this statement. Having heard it from the Blessed One, the monks will remember it."

"In that case, monks, listen & pay close attention. I will speak."

"As you say, lord," the monks responded.

The Blessed One said, "Gain arises for an uninstructed run-of-the-mill person. He does not reflect, 'Gain has arisen for me. It is inconstant, stressful, & subject to change.' He does not discern it as it actually is.

"Loss arises... Status arises... Disgrace arises... Censure arises... Praise arises... Pleasure arises...

"Pain arises. He does not reflect, 'Pain has arisen for me. It is inconstant, stressful, & subject to change.' He does not discern it as it actually is.

"His mind remains consumed with the gain. His mind remains consumed with the loss... with the status... the disgrace... the censure... the praise... the pleasure. His mind remains consumed with the pain.

"He welcomes the arisen gain and rebels against the arisen loss. He welcomes the arisen status and rebels against the arisen disgrace. He welcomes the arisen praise and rebels against the arisen censure. He welcomes the arisen pleasure and rebels against the arisen pain. As he is thus engaged in welcoming & rebelling, he is not released from birth, aging, or death; from sorrows, lamentations, pains, distresses, or despairs. He is not released, I tell you, from suffering & stress.

"Now, gain arises for a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones. He reflects, 'Gain has arisen for me. It is inconstant, stressful, & subject to change.' He discerns it as it actually is.

"Loss arises... Status arises... Disgrace arises... Censure arises... Praise arises... Pleasure arises...

"Pain arises. He reflects, 'Pain has arisen for me. It is inconstant, stressful, & subject to change.' He discerns it as it actually is.

"His mind does not remain consumed with the gain. His mind does not remain consumed with the loss... with the status... the disgrace... the censure... the praise... the pleasure. His mind does not remain consumed with the pain.

"He does not welcome the arisen gain, or rebel against the arisen loss. He does not welcome the arisen status, or rebel against the arisen disgrace. He does not welcome the arisen praise, or rebel against the arisen censure. He does not welcome the arisen pleasure, or rebel against the arisen pain. As he thus abandons welcoming & rebelling, he is released from birth, aging, & death; from sorrows, lamentations, pains, distresses, & despairs. He is released, I tell you, from suffering & stress.

"This is the difference, this the distinction, this the distinguishing factor between the well-instructed disciple of the noble ones and the uninstructed run-of-the-mill person."

Lokavipatti Sutta

submitted by jaxytee
[link] [comment]