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Buddhism
A reddit for all kinds of Buddhist teachings
Updated: 1 hour 37 min ago

Question for Buddhist parents about raising their children.

August 29, 2014 - 12:23pm

I'd love to either have children of my own or adopt in the future, and I was wondering how raising a child in a Buddhist household may be different than how I was raised, in a Christian household. My parents are Christian pastors and were very strict on Christian principles as we grew up, as such becoming an adult was a shock in many ways. Do you encourage Buddhist practices with your children, allow them to find their own path, or some sort of mixture?

TL;DR Do you encourage Buddhist practices with your children, allow them to find their own path, or some sort of mixture?

submitted by najoes
[link] [7 comments]

An argument about the Christian story of the forbidden fruit

August 29, 2014 - 12:02pm

An argument about the Christian story of the forbidden fruit (whether it is cannon or not) is Buddhist in many respects.

Forbidden fruit because it gave eternal knowledge

Knowledge is by its nature a recollection

Recollections are based on memory and vulnerable to distortion

To have faith in knowledge that is distorted is an assumption that one is correct

Assumption at its core is the belief without evidence that your view is correct

To have a correct (or objective) view, one cannot rely on subjective experiences

Subjective experience is something that any living creature experiences in the moment

Objective experience is emergent from collective communication of experiences

The taking of the apple represents humans thinking their capacity to think puts them outside of nature, and so 'better' able to make choices for themselves.

A better way always exists because information flow has a maximum speed depending on the medium means that we never have the full picture

With no best way to be anymore, humans have to keep changing their minds on what they want Instead of just being

submitted by lostminty
[link] [13 comments]

Planning on getting a tattoo, but would it affect any yet-future renunciation?

August 29, 2014 - 12:03am

I only want the one, simple tattoo. It would say, "Now." And it would serve as a constant reminder to stay mindful, etc. I can reasonably get it within the next month.

But I'm also strongly considering ordaining at some point in my life. Not that that would be for years and years, as I'm relatively new to Buddhism. Would there be any conflict there? Or is that not something that a sangha would care about?

submitted by NewLeaf37
[link] [16 comments]

Stretched Ears

August 28, 2014 - 7:16pm

Although I know this may not matter much to many, I have always been curious about the depictions of the Buddha with stretched earlobes. I have done some preliminary reading about the fact that it represents that he removed them (since as a rich prince, he would have had ear jewelry etc.?) when he renounced worldly possessions. I'm wondering though, do any other practitioners have stretched ears? I do, and am wondering what will be..."expected" of me, for lack of a better word, as I delve further into my practice. Would removing earrings etc. be similar to shaving heads/etc.? Thanks for any insight, I always appreciate the thoughtful responses in this sub!

submitted by jruid
[link] [13 comments]

Buddhism with relationships and marriage - can it work?

August 28, 2014 - 6:43pm

I'd like to do a bit more reading on the topic but I'm interested in hearing your opinions on relationships. The current state of a romantic relationship in western culture is a very egocentric one - you define yourself through one another, and through the things that you purchase together (houses, cars etc). Even attitudes towards promiscuity are based on a cultivation of egoic attitudes and manifest themselves as a doomed pursuit of desire.

I understand buddhism encourages love, but what place does romance have in a Buddhist mindset? Because every personal experience I have feels selfish.

submitted by HOSTILE_SEABIRD
[link] [24 comments]

Ask /r/buddhism: What to do with a statue of the Buddha that has sustained some damage?

August 28, 2014 - 5:43pm

I have at my home a wooden statue of the Buddha. It doesn't belong to me, but to a person who has since moved away and left the statue behind.

It is a Thai-style statue of a standing Buddha with an alms bowl, with the typical long "spike" (for lack of a better term) on the top of the head. (It's not the ushnisha - this is a much longer, well, spike).

The spike is broken. I have tried to repair the statue by attaching a replacement spike that I fashioned from a dried mixture of dark paint and some wooden dust, but, alas, the replacement spike fell off after a couple of months.

Since it looks like I won't be able to repair the statue, what would you advise that I do next? I have been sort of living in denial about this for a long time, thinking that since I did not invite the statue into my place it is not my responsibility to resolve the current situation, but obviously that is not true and I really want to do something about it.

submitted by nyoronyoro
[link] [6 comments]

Loving-Kindness Supports the World

August 28, 2014 - 3:48pm

An excerpt from Loving-Kindness Supports the World

A Thai monk I know once taught me the phrase lokopatthambhika metta or “loving-kindness supports the world.”

But how? It is difficult to imagine, for the world seems supported, or certainly permeated, by darkness, evil, hatred, violence. You might think it must be a optimist/pessimist kind of thing, you know, where the glass is either half empty or half full. That’s not it, though. It is a whole other way of thinking. It’s like when John and Yoko said war is over, if you want it.

If we want it, metta or loving-kindness can be an active force. The Tevigga Sutta says,

And he lets his mind pervade one quarter of the world with thoughts of loving-kindness, and so the second, and so the third, and so the fourth. And thus the whole wide world, above, below, around, and everywhere, does he continue to pervade with a heart of loving-kindness, far-reaching, grown great, and beyond measure.”

submitted by michellerosado
[link] [2 comments]

You can go up to the 4th jhana using "these eight thoughts of a great person"

August 28, 2014 - 2:25pm

AN 8.30: Anuruddha Sutta

(1) “This Dhamma is for one with few desires, not for one with strong desires.

(2) This Dhamma is for one who is content, not for one who is discontent.

(3) This Dhamma is for one who resorts to solitude, not for one who delights in company.

(4) This Dhamma is for one who is energetic, not for one who is lazy.

(5) This Dhamma is for one with mindfulness established, not for one who is muddle-minded.

(6) This Dhamma is for one who is concentrated, not for one who is unconcentrated.

(7) This Dhamma is for one who is wise, not for one who is unwise...”

(8) ‘This Dhamma is for one who delights in non-proliferation, who takes delight in nonproliferation, not for one who delights in proliferation, who takes delight in proliferation.’

When...you reflect on these eight thoughts of a great person, then, as much as you wish...you will enter and dwell in the first jh?na...fourth jh?na...

[...]

(1) “When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one with few desires, not for one with strong desires,’ with reference to what was this said? Here, when a bhikkhu is one with few desires, he does not desire: ‘Let people know me to be one with few desires.’ When he is content, he does not desire: ‘Let people know me to be one who is content.’ When he resorts to solitude, he does not desire: ‘Let people know me to be one who resorts to solitude.’ When he is energetic, he does not desire: ‘Let people know me to be energetic.’ When he is mindful, he does not desire: ‘Let people know me to be mindful.’ When he is concentrated, he does not desire: ‘Let people know me to be concentrated.’ When he is wise, he does not desire: ‘Let people know me to be wise.’ When he delights in non-proliferation, he does not desire: ‘Let people know me to be one who delights in non-proliferation.’ When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one with few desires, not for one with strong desires,’ it is with reference to this that this was said.

(2) “When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who is content, not for one who is discontent,’ with reference to what was this said? Here, a bhikkhu is content with any kind of robes, almsfood, lodgings, and medicines and provisions for the sick. When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who is content, not for one who is discontent,’ it is with reference to this that this was said.

(3) “When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who resorts to solitude, not for one who delights in company,’ with reference to what was this said? Here, when a bhikkhu resorts to solitude, bhikkhus, bhikkhun?s, male lay followers, female lay followers, kings, royal ministers, heads of other sects, and disciples belonging to other sects approach him. In each case, with a mind that slants, slopes, and inclines to seclusion, withdrawn, delighting in renunciation, he gives them a talk invariably concerned with dismissing them. When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who resorts to solitude, not for one who delights in company,’ it is with reference to this that this was said.

(4) “When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who is energetic, not for one who is lazy,’ with reference to what was this said? Here, a bhikkhu has aroused energy for abandoning unwholesome qualities and acquiring wholesome qualities; he is strong, firm in exertion, not casting off the duty of cultivating wholesome qualities. When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who is energetic, not for one who is lazy,’ it is with reference to this that this was said.

(5) “When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one with mindfulness established, not for one who is muddle-minded,’ with reference to what was this said? Here, a bhikkhu is mindful, possessing supreme mindfulness and alertness, one who remembers and recollects what was done and said long ago. When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one with mindfulness established, not for one who is muddle-minded,’ it is with reference to this that this was said.

(6) “When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who is concentrated, not for one who is unconcentrated,’ with reference to what was this said? Here, secluded from sensual pleasures … a bhikkhu enters and dwells in the fourth jh?na. When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who is concentrated, not for one who is unconcentrated,’ it is with reference to this that this was said.

(7) “When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who is wise, not for one who is unwise,’ with reference to what was this said? Here, a bhikkhu is wise; he possesses the wisdom that discerns arising and passing away, which is noble and penetrative and leads to the complete destruction of suffering. When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who is wise, not for one who is unwise,’ it is with reference to this that this was said.

(8) “When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who delights in non-proliferation, who takes delight in non-proliferation, not for one who delights in proliferation, who takes delight in proliferation,’ with reference to what was this said? Here, a bhikkhu’s mind launches out upon the cessation of proliferation, becomes placid, settles down, and is liberated in it. When it was said: ‘This Dhamma is for one who delights in non-proliferation, who takes delight in non-proliferation, not for one who delights in proliferation, who takes delight in proliferation,’ it is with reference to this that this was said.”

submitted by Vimutti
[link] [8 comments]

How would the Buddha smell roses?

August 28, 2014 - 1:09pm

I went out for a walk a little while ago, because I had the time to do so (rare for me) and it has been a long time since I practiced walking meditation.

It's an overcast, cool-but-humid day here in my corner of the city. There is a lot of new construction going on, so the cool air has that faint smell of freshly cut lumber. I walked through the garden of a local hospital, and the heaviness of the air put the smell of roses right in my face. These smells, plus the weather, and the strange quietness of the city street had a huge effect on my mood and state-of-mind.

But should they? I can follow those sensations and have an awesome moment in a fairly unlikely place. But should I? What happens when I'm suck on a city bus next to a screaming child in the pouring rain? I'm not so much curious about how to process or accept those situations as I am curious about how to handle ones like today. Buddhism (especially discussion boards) is so full of non-answers like "just be aware of it" which really do nothing for those of us who are too new to undersand what you're talking about. Almost makes me think I'm doing something wrong by enjoying my environment. Like I'm judging it or placing a value on it that would need to have a negative counterpart to exist (screaming child, bus, rain). Like I shouldn't accept good feelings that come from outside of myself.

How would the Buddha smell roses?

submitted by IKilledPaulAllen
[link] [8 comments]

buddhism and relationships

August 28, 2014 - 12:49pm

I don't see too many, if any, monks in love. Haha. Isn't it possible to love without attachment? For two people to be together in a romantic way but not suffer because of it? Or is this just not possible? I know eventually your partner dies and you suffer the loss, but being mindful of this and loving anyways and keeping a steady practice going should cushion that blow a bit, right? I mean it's either that or remain alone forever. Which I am ok with also. But I met someone that I really connect with on a spiritual level and would like to explore this relationship further. It's not even about sex. I feel like I found a soul mate.

How do buddhists handle relationships? In my last relationship I stopped my practice and downward spiraled into chaos with the other person and ended up in an unhealthy relationship. This time, the other person and I both have a similar practice. And oddly enough, in their last relationship they were also with someone unhealthy and didn't keep up their practice either. Now we meet each other, and can both support each other in the practice. This feels wonderful!

I will be completely honest though. Since I have met this person I have been feeling intense craving and desire. We live far away from each other (20 hour drive) and talk online. I channel my passions into creative and constructive outlets. I have felt inspired to play more music and eat healthier and work out more. But it just dawned on me that I could be driving this girl crazy. She is having trouble sleeping and keeps inviting me to meet her and I have work and I'm low on money and just won't be able to for awhile. I started a new job recently and cant ask for time off yet. Plus I am starting my own business and recently got a new contract and have to meet a tight deadline.

The whole thing seems a bit crazy. I am not the type of person to do this AT ALL. Normally, I am content alone and when I go out with friends I meet girls and if they like me and are cute I will possibly hook up with them. But I'm never the one pursuing the ladies. Here comes the cheesy line, this girl is different, and I never met anyone like her. I found her online through a mutual friend and while she is very attractive it really isnt her looks that I like most. I feel a type of deep spiritual connection that kind of possessed me and drew me in. For the first time in my life I could not hold back. But now I feel like I may just be causing her frustration. Some random guy throws himself at her that lives far away and can't visit anytime soon. But I also kind of like that the connection is not physical.

Meditation has been difficult with all of this increased emotion but not impossible, I am still able to let go and reach a really deep calm state. But I think about her almost all day every day when I'm not in meditation, and it takes quite awhile to clear these thoughts during meditation too. I used to be able to just go right into it. Now it's like I watch a wild flame dance for awhile first (my mind) before it finally settles back into nothing. I feel such strong desire but desire is the root of all suffering. I'm feeling conflicted and meditating on these new developments. I appreciate any input you all have for me. Thank you :D

submitted by cchandleriv
[link] [31 comments]

Buddhism and the Chakras

August 28, 2014 - 12:29pm

What is the traditional Buddhist approach to chakras? I used to use psychedelic drugs heavily, and i feel the culmination of my drug experimentation came during my last LSD trip, during which i believe i had a spiritual awakening. Ever since then i can feel energy flowing through my body, i can feel each individual chakra point, and often times feel as though the crown of my head is being prodded and stroked by somebodies hands at pretty much all points during the day, these feelings are present in as well mediation, even though the sensations become more of a vibration in meditation accompanied by hearing a vibration tone as well that i can tune into and tune out of.

I have recently decided to follow traditional Buddhism as it makes the most amount of sense to me at this point in my life. Previously I have looked into other types of Buddhism like Tibetan Buddhism also known as Indian Vajrayana. I have read literature like the Tibetan book of the dead and Natural Liberation: Padmasambhava's Teachings on the Six Bardos, which all have chakras as an important part of their beliefs, but there are other things about the religion that trouble me like the many deities.

Looking at Buddhism based on the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama, there is not much mentioned about the chakras. Are they just parts of the body that i have heightened awareness of, and could anyone shed some light on the sensations on the crown of my head? Any help would be much appreciated :)

submitted by DeathAndRebirth
[link] [14 comments]

Help understanding volitional formations

August 28, 2014 - 12:28pm

I'm reading up on the 12 nidanas, and I don't understand volitional formations well.

This is what I think it is (and this can be wrong):

The choosing of decisions and carrying them out.

Can someone explain what it is to me?

submitted by obliviron
[link] [17 comments]