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Buddhism
A reddit for all kinds of Buddhist teachings
Updated: 17 min 21 sec ago

Whenever I try "letting go" it just feels like I'm suppressing my emotions

29 min 38 sec ago

For example, I was seriously disappointed today about some awesome plans that ended up not coming through. I was feeling super disappointed and kind of bitter for a few hours. I tried to let go but the frustration would just stay there. When I'd start to feel pissed I'd think "No, this is not the right way to think. Let go. I'm still me, this doesn't matter in the context of my life, etc."

Any help in this area?

submitted by zach84
[link] [comment]

Understanding Consciousness and Letting Go. (Quote)

45 min 24 sec ago

"We all believe in something...even if we believe there's nothing to believe. I'm not interested in telling you what I believe...and trying to make you believe in something. But I'm curious: How do you know what you know? How did you get your beliefs? What is it in the moment? We could know the truth of everything. What does the consciousness know? For just one moment...if we could get it all out...if we could just know for one moment what our consciousness was...is...and where it came from. And get it all out.

What if we could crack through the illusion of linear time...in the same moment? What if we could experience all of history and all of eternity...in a single moment? For this single point in all of eternity...knowing all the know...we choose our next thought. This next thought will be the seed for our new belief...our new perception of a new world. Forgive any resentment. Release any anger. Dissolve any guilt. Refrain my regrets. Accept anything I may be resisting. Love away any fear. And walk through the doorway." -C.C. (Unknown)

Thoughts?

submitted by KateUptonsDick
[link] [comment]

Meditation question

55 min 58 sec ago

Why is meditation so difficult? I assume Buddha answered this question. Please explain like I'm five if you can.

submitted by ColdDesert77
[link] [2 comments]

(meditation) Have you ever been through a time in which you had difficulty meditating? How did you work through this?

3 hours 1 min ago

I've been having trouble meditating lately. I usually don't have trouble clearing my mind and focusing within, but lately I've felt so frazzled that even basic meditation seems futile. Any tips?

submitted by NaNa_Ziggurat
[link] [9 comments]

Feels like the world is running on fast-forward after day of a lot of effort.

5 hours 23 min ago

I come to you for advice; and just to share a recent experience - and to hear your input on it. Not sure if I just want to share, or if part of me thinks something is wrong, or if I want to know if it's normal - I guess I'm just hoping for insight. :)

I have been spending a lot of time practicing for the past couple of weeks. Yesterday I experienced it for the first time, and now it has happened again:

I usually walk around aware of what is going on in my head, being mindful of what happens, and how I interact with the world. For the past couple of days I have put in a lot more effort than I usually do, and when evening comes - something odd happens. I am extremely aware of the present moment, but not so much aware of my thoughts - and the shift happens really quickly.

It's like I'm only reaction. If I hear a noise, I don't see the impulse to look arise in my mind, I just look. During the day I can feel anger, or other feelings arise in my body and mind, and choose to be mindful while not acting them out. In the evening I am no longer able to do so - they just flow (But I don't hold on to them either).

I'm thinking that maybe I'm burning out a lot of my concentration during the day, or straining my brain a bit too much. But it's an interesting change in my experience, that I don't recall encountering before. When people say something to me for instance, I respond without even thinking about what I'm going to say. It's instant reaction.

And I feel the tiniest impulses and changes within my body. I am aware of blinking, and I barely seem to think at all. I'm even aware of the way my eyes dart around, when I look at an image. It's kind of odd, because I've always been extremely aware of my own thoughts and feelings, so it's just new. The whole world feels like it's sped up - like everything is running on fast-forward if that makes sense.

Anyway, what do you think it is?

submitted by dalsgaard
[link] [2 comments]

Understanding Nagarjuna's Catu?ko?i

6 hours 11 min ago

Wikipedia Catu?ko?i

A typical piece of Buddhist dialectical apparatus is the ...(catuskoti). It consists of four members in a relation of exclusive disjunction ("one of, but not more than one of, 'a,' 'b,' 'c,' 'd,' is true"). Buddhist dialecticians, from Gautama onward, have negated each of the alternatives, and thus have negated the entire proposition. As these alternatives were supposedly exhaustive, their exhaustive negation has been termed "pure negation" and has been taken as evidence for the claim that Madhyamika is negativism.

This has also been called a 'tetralemma'

I particularly enjoy the way this can tie in with ??nyat? (see Nagarjuna's Diamond Slivers ). This helps with a better 'explanation' of sunyata in that neither are all postulates true nor are they false yet they are all also true and false. If you don't understand that, good! It is an effective form of MU

Discussion? :D

submitted by Katuskoti
[link] [2 comments]

Understanding Nagarjuna's Catu?ko?i

6 hours 11 min ago

Wikipedia Catu?ko?i

A typical piece of Buddhist dialectical apparatus is the ...(catuskoti). It consists of four members in a relation of exclusive disjunction ("one of, but not more than one of, 'a,' 'b,' 'c,' 'd,' is true"). Buddhist dialecticians, from Gautama onward, have negated each of the alternatives, and thus have negated the entire proposition. As these alternatives were supposedly exhaustive, their exhaustive negation has been termed "pure negation" and has been taken as evidence for the claim that Madhyamika is negativism.

This has also been called a 'tetralemma'

I particularly enjoy the way this can tie in with ??nyat? (see Nagarjuna's Diamond Slivers ). This helps with a better 'explanation' of sunyata in that neither are all postulates true nor are they false yet they are all also true and false. If you don't understand that, good! It is an effective form of MU

Discussion? :D

submitted by Katuskoti
[link] [2 comments]

What are your daily/weekly dharma routines?

6 hours 49 min ago

No judgments/comparisons.

I'm just looking for ideas based on others' experiences.

submitted by NaanSt0p
[link] [3 comments]

Buddhist resources for help and support for the fifth precept?

7 hours 16 min ago

Hey friends. The fifth precept is something that I struggle with. I'm an alcoholic, so it might not be as easy as some people. For me, all the other precepts are not even something I can focus on if I am drinking, and drinking is something that I do regularly if I do it at all. I have some support systems in place, but I would value a Buddhist perceptive.

Thank you.

submitted by CloudDrone
[link] [6 comments]

The Object of Negation

7 hours 52 min ago

from Ven. Thubten Chödron’s interview on the topic of emptiness with Lama Zopa Rinpoche at Sravasti Abbey January 29, 2005:

But in Pabongka’s text it says there is mere appearance of the object for a brief moment. Through analysis you can get the idea. For example, when you see a drum, analyze it at the same time. Be aware that your mind is labeling “drum” by seeing that base. Be aware at the same time as you’re labeling. Analyze: to be able to label drum you have to see a specific phenomenon. Even though the table is round like a drum, you won’t label “drum” on the base you label “table.” It has to be a specific base that performs the function of making sound and that has material to produce sound when hit. You have to see that base first. Then because of the function it performs—what it’s used for—the mind merely labels drum. Seeing that base—its shape, color, etc.—and knowing it has that function become the reason to label “drum.”

When you are aware and analyze at the same time as the labeling process is occurring—that is, you’re analyzing while you’re labeling drum—then, at that time, at the beginning there is a mere appearance.

If you’re aware of the brief instant the mind initially sees that base, the instant you’re starting to label drum, there is a mere appearance. When you’re aware the instant you begin to label drum, you’ll be aware that there’s no real drum existing from its own side. You’ll be aware that drum is merely imputed by seeing that base—that which performs the function of making sound when struck. At that moment, there’s just the mere appearance of a drum.

That awareness of the mere appearance of a drum lasts a very short second. It doesn’t last because you don’t continue that awareness or mindfulness and because you don’t yet have the realization that it exists in mere name, merely labeled by mind. And because the negative imprint left by the past ignorance is there, it projects a truly existent appearance on the drum and you see a real drum that exists from its own side. That’s the gag-cha, the object of negation.

...

True, or inherent, existence is the gag-cha, the object of negation. It appears and we grasp it as true. That is, we believe the label exists on the base. Because of our deep habit of believing this, when phenomena appear to us, they appear to exist from the side of their base—from there on the base, appearing from there. But in fact, when you come in the room, you see this phenomenon with legs and a seat that you can sit on. Before seeing it, you don’t label “chair.” Why not? Because there’s no reason for your mind to label “chair.” There’s no reason at all. The label “chair” doesn’t come first. First you have to see the base. Your mind sees that and immediately brings up the label.

...

First you see the base; the next moment your mind gives it a label. The same mind sees this base and then generates the label. The mind merely imputes the label “chair.” It makes up the label “chair” and then believes in that. In fact, nothing is going onto the object; there’s nothing concrete going there and sticking on the object. Rather, the mind imputes and then believes the object is that label. The difficulty and the wrong view begin just when the label has been imputed; we look and the object appears from there. There seems to be the object there, existing from its own side, not something that was merely labeled by mind, but something that is the object there on the base.

That is the object of negation. It appears as a real chair or person or table, not one that exists by being merely labeled. The reality is that your mind merely imputed “chair” just now by seeing the base.

So it is not the base upon which we label "whatever" that does not exist, but rather, the "truly existing whatever that emanates whatever-ness from its own side independent of our labeling its base 'whatever"" that doesn't exist. That exists in name only, like an illusion.

So it is not the base upon which we label "I" that does not exist (the base of "I" being the dependently-arisen aggregates), but rather the "truly existing I which emanates I-ness from its own side independent of our labeling its base 'I'" that doesn't exist. That exists in name only, like an illusion.

submitted by hyperbolist
[link] [1 comment]

Today's poem from TK

9 hours 8 min ago
By Traktung Khepa

Meditation in solitary places make the yogi happy.

Prayers and offerings make the protectors happy.

Cash up front makes most gurus happy.

Wandering the expanse without care is my happiness.

Right motivation and pure heart makes the Buddhas happy.

Fearless Conduct makes the siddha happy.

Approving glances and compliments make most disciples happy.

Wandering the expanse without care is my happiness.

The expanse of teachings makes the student happy..

The extent of space makes the Garuda happy.

The stretch of mind’s tangled machinations keeps most people happy.

Wandering the expanse without care is my happiness.

The beauties of puja make the devotee happy.

Blazing and dripping in secret channels makes the yogi happy.

A little wet friction makes most men happy.

Wandering the expanse without care is my happiness.

Pure dharma lineage makes the practitioner happy.

The heritage of secret conduct makes the yogin happy.

Eagerly waiting inheritance makes most people happy.

Wandering the expanse without care is my happiness.

Accumulating mantra makes the mantrica happy.

Working the koan makes the zen person happy.

Tallying money makes the sangha treasurer happy.

Wandering the expanse without care is my happiness.

Hearing praise of the guru makes the disciple happy.

Listening to the sound of emptiness makes the yogin happy.

Celebrity gossip makes TV watchers happy.

Wandering without care in the vast expanse is my happiness.

With the empty sky as my home,

And a happy mind as my dogma,

I wander with nowhere to go.

  • t.k.
submitted by busuku
[link] [1 comment]

Buddhist perspective on rejecting others

10 hours 3 min ago

I often read about how to deal with rejection, but how should a Buddhist go about rejecting others when it is needed?

submitted by SirHampshire
[link] [7 comments]

Knowing Whispers: Seeing Through a Glass Darkly

11 hours 20 min ago

(Knowing Whispers) The only problems we have are with self.

We see life through our eyes and they become blurred by identification with the mind, ego and imagination.

Our ideas, beliefs and opinions prejudice us against the truth about self and others. We do not see life purely, because our identification with life is polluted by our mind.

Truth, Love, and Healing manifest naturally, when we identify with feelings and awareness. Without the distractions of thought, mind and opinion, life is seen through the purity of our consciousness.

We no longer see life through our mind, thoughts and opinions, but rather through pure conscious awareness of our being.

**If you enjoyed this whisper, please share it with others.

Namaste, C.J. and Robert

submitted by whispers2014
[link] [5 comments]

I need some help understanding

11 hours 26 min ago

English is not my first language, sorry for any mistakes. Also, I don't know if you provide advice. Sorry if this is the wrong sub

Hi.

First, I'm not a Buddhist, but I think your philosophy is really good so I'm first trying to find something to read. I already did the Questions and Answers book, and I want to keep going with something more profound.

So first question would be: Any recommendations for starters?

Also, I'm work as a practitioner on an IT company. I've been working with many customers and they seem happy with my work, also my boss and the company's owner are happy too. But I feel like my boss feels threatened by me and I'm not in any means a threat to him, he is really good in what he does and he has a lot of experience, it just happens I love what I do and I'm good at it. Besides, I'm trying to get enrolled in an University overseas, so they know I don't plan on stay long. They want to hire me and I want to earn 10, not because I need the 10 to live but because I think it's fair (I own a pretty small grocery store and that provides enough) but they are offering me 6, which I'm not accepting. Today my boss and the company's owner are going to talk to me. I love what I do but I feel if they don't give me what I want, it means they don't really appreciate my job and also I know they have money because I've been in the meetings with the customer and 10 is not abusive at all (I know they have expenses and stuff, but still, they get like 130 out of the work I'm doing).

I just read the Ame ni mo Makezu poem and it made me feel calm and that's why I want your honest opinion.

Thank you in advance.

submitted by saisar
[link] [10 comments]