/r/Buddhism

Syndicate content
Buddhism
A reddit for all kinds of Buddhist teachings
Updated: 1 hour 31 min ago

Are You Enlightened?

1 hour 46 min ago

A lot of people ask questions about enlightenment but the answer is not that if you ARE enlightened you don't know. That's silly and defeats the whole point of the quest because how do you know when you "are done"?

There are specific signs and abilities gained from the tremendous effort it took to penetrate to the heart of reality, that heart which is connected to all wisdoms, samadhis, and powers.

Please refer to the following links, especially the last: http://buddhism.about.com/od/basicbuddhistteachings/tp/awarenesses.htm http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/sutra/level2_lamrim/initial_scope/safe_direction/thirty_excellent_signs_major_marks_.html http://www.meditationexpert.com/life-wisdom/l_are_you_enlightened.htm

I would appreciate any other sutta-based links in answer to this question for future questioners.

submitted by megamorphg
[link] [comment]

A little anecdote about practice, and how wisdom is intertwined with it.

2 hours 37 min ago

For the past 2 or 3 months, I've been trying to get back on track with my meditation practice and I think that just recently I've found the root of all my problems. It's like I've been trying to get two wires to connect and sometimes there's a few sparks, but there's no connection going on, no electricity flowing through and therefore no lightbulb.

I used to be pretty intense in practice, with breathing meditation, metta, mindfulness, etc. etc. and when it came to the time whenever school was about to end, I couldn't figure out any way to modify my practice (although I had numerous opportunities, I just couldn't wrap my mind around it) to fit my declining energy level. School, my own mental and emotional health problems, and my parents' recent divorce were all taking a huge toll on my energy reserves.

I was hesitant to put down my practice because I know the benefits of meditation and maybe at some point I was attached to those benefits and experiences, although a more wholesome thing to "attach" yourself to it was still a negative influence that barricaded me from dropping my practice.

So eventually I did, and then my parents' divorce took a huge turn for the worse and so did my energy. While it was still stressful to deal with that situation it was a lot less intense as it was before since I started going to therapy and didn't have the overbearing weight of school and exams above my head.

But to get to the point, I've been trying to fit meditation into my life ever since my energy level started to recover and it seemed like I had just been lazing around for the longest while. I knew the negative influences I had been exposed to for the past 2 months or so had put some damage into my morality and the physical and mental habits I had made for myself.

All this time, like I explained in the "lightbulb" analogy, there had been little sparks of focus and will to practice, but I didn't know what was keeping me back from really achieving what I was looking for. In the end, it turned out that my real problem was that I was living in the past, looking towards the experiences I had with meditation in the past and trying to re-create those experiences out of thin air. Does it make sense to try to recreate the exact experience and feeling of riding a rollercoaster? While it might be very similar and precise, you are still not on the rollercoaster and will return to not being on the rollercoaster.

So in the middle of relaxing in bed and trying to observe my emotions, thoughts, and the tension in my muscles again, I had a sudden thought hit me like a train. "Michael! You've been so focused on what you've been and what you want to live up to, that you aren't focused on your values, morals, and practices!"

When you are focused on anything than what you should be focused on, whether it's a hollow image of what you're trying to focus on, or a bunch of hypothetical events or ways things could go wrong, you will not be doing what you normally would do if you were in those experiences of the past.

Keep your mind focused on the present moment and on what's appropriate outside of it, and remember the wisdoms that you've learned along the path, or the wisdoms you've just begun to learn. Knowledge and practice are two equally important values of learning that support each other!

submitted by kazoodles
[link] [comment]

question about buddhist scripture

4 hours 31 min ago

i am a long time practitioner but new to the texts. it looks like none of them are actually the buddha's own words. the earliest one looks like the pali cannon, which came some 400 years after the buddha died?

nobody wrote anything down while the buddha was alive? the buddha didnt write anything down? people just passed it down verbally for 400 years and everybody understood it the exact same say so nothing was changed or lost over time? really?

submitted by cchandleriv
[link] [11 comments]

Have any of you reached enlightenment? Do you know of anyone who has?

7 hours 5 min ago

In my experience, there never seems to be any admission by practicing Buddhists as to whether they are enlightened or not. Is there a rationale behind this? Or have I just missed these examples?

submitted by HOSTILE_SEABIRD
[link] [23 comments]

How can I deal with stress ans anxiety caused by college?

9 hours 31 min ago

I will be starting my second semester in school soon and as it approaches I am becoming more anxious and stressed out about things, mostly my sex life and getting good grades.

These are both things that I feel to some degree j have little control over and cause me much embarrassment when asked about, it doesn't feel good at all. Is there a way I can change this energy into positive energy to help myself?

submitted by Androidover
[link] [4 comments]

What does Om Mani Padme Hum mean to you?

August 19, 2014 - 6:40pm

I have it tattooed on my arm, and people always ask me what it means. If I feel like they're just politely asking, I just mention it's a Buddhist mantra about love and compassion. But if they're sincere in their question, I sometimes struggle to explain it because it's so vast and deep, I kind of tell them that it would take me a good half hour to explain.

For the most part, I feel as if it encompasses the entire Dharma in one simple phrase. Chanting it reminds me of why I choose to follow the path. To purify my mind and body to achieve enlightenment. By simply stating Om Mani Padme Hum, I accomplish that one moment at a time.

How would you respond?

submitted by LivingInTheVoid
[link] [8 comments]

Buddha's Short Discourse on Karma

August 19, 2014 - 6:29pm

This is one of my favorite discourses, short and sweet, on the effects of different courses of action. I can't think of a better, simpler guide to living than this beautiful verse.

Taken from [Access to Insight]http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/nanamoli/wheel248.html

Majjhima Nikaya 135: The Shorter Exposition of Kamma (Cula-kammavibhanga Sutta)

  1. Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was living at Savatthi in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's Park.

Then Subha the student (brahman), Todeyya's son, went to the Blessed One and exchanged greetings with him, and when the courteous and amiable talk was finished, he sat down at one side. When he had done so, Subha the student said to the Blessed One:

  1. "Master Gotama, what is the reason, what is the condition, why inferiority and superiority are met with among human beings, among mankind? For one meets with short-lived and long-lived people, sick and healthy people, ugly and beautiful people, insignificant and influential people, poor and rich people, low-born and high-born people, stupid and wise people. What is the reason, what is the condition, why superiority and inferiority are met with among human beings, among mankind?"

  2. "Student, beings are owners of kammas, heirs of kammas, they have kammas as their progenitor, kammas as their kin, kammas as their homing-place. It is kammas that differentiate beings according to inferiority and superiority."

  3. "I do not understand the detailed meaning of Master Gotama's utterance spoken in brief without expounding the detailed meaning. It would be good if Master Gotama taught me the Dhamma so that I might understand the detailed meaning of Master Gotama's utterance spoken in brief without expounding the detailed meaning."

"Then listen, student, and heed well what I shall say."

"Even so, Master Gotama," Subha the student replied. The Blessed One said this:

  1. "Here, student, some woman or man is a killer of living beings, murderous, bloody-handed, given to blows and violence, merciless to living beings. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a state of deprivation, in an unhappy destination, in perdition, in hell. If, on the dissolution of the body, after death, instead of his reappearing in a state of deprivation, in an unhappy destination, in perdition, in hell, he comes to the human state, he is short-lived wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to short life, that is to say, to be a killer of living beings, murderous, bloody-handed, given to blows and violence, merciless to living beings.

  2. "But here some woman or man, having abandoned the killing of living beings, abstains from killing living beings, lays aside the rod and lays aside the knife, is considerate and merciful and dwells compassionate for the welfare of all living beings. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a happy destination, in the heavenly world. If, on the dissolution of the body, after death, instead of his reappearing in a happy destination, in the heavenly world, he comes to the human state, he is long-lived wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to long life, that is to say, to have abandoned the killing of living beings, to abstain from killing living beings, to lay aside the rod and lay aside the knife, to be considerate and merciful, and to dwell compassionate for the welfare of all living beings.

  3. "Here, student, some woman or man is one who harms beings with his hands or with clods or with sticks or with knives. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a state of deprivation... If instead he comes to the human state, he is sickly wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to sickness, that is to say, to be one who harms beings with one's hands or with clods or with sticks or with knives.

  4. "But here some woman or man is not one who harms beings with his hands, or with clods, or with sticks, or with knives. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a happy destination... If instead he comes to the human state, he is healthy wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to health, that is to say, not to be one who harms beings with his hands or with clods or with sticks or with knives.

  5. "Here, student, some woman or man is angry, much given to rage; even when little is said, he is furious, angry, ill-disposed, resentful, he shows ill-temper, hate and surliness. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a state of deprivation... If instead he comes to the human state, he is ugly wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to ugliness, that is to say, to be furious, angry, ill-disposed, resentful, and to show ill-temper, hate and surliness.

  6. "But here some woman or man is not angry or much given to rage; even when much is said, he is not furious, angry, ill-disposed, resentful, nor does he show ill-temper, hate or surliness. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a happy destination... If instead he comes to the human state, he is beautiful wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to beauty, that is to say, not to be angry or given to much rage; even when much is said, not to be furious, angry, ill-disposed or resentful, or to show ill-temper, hate or surliness.

  7. "Here, student, some woman or man is envious; he envies, begrudges and harbors envy about others' gains, honor, veneration, respect, salutations and offerings. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a state of deprivation... If instead he comes to the human state, he is insignificant wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to insignificance, that is to say, to be envious, to envy, begrudge, and harbor envy about others' gain, honor, veneration, respect, salutations and offerings.

  8. "But here some woman or man is not envious, he does not envy, begrudge or harbor envy about others' gain, honor, veneration, respect, salutations and offerings. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a happy destination... If instead he comes to the human state, he is influential wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to influence, that is to say, not to be envious, not to envy, begrudge or harbor envy about others' gain, honor, veneration, respect, salutations and offerings.

  9. "Here, student, some woman or man is not a giver of food, drink, cloth, sandals, garlands, perfumes, unguents, bed, roof and lighting to monks or brahmans. Due to having performed and completed such kamma, on the dissolution of the body, after death he reappears in a state of deprivation... If instead he comes to the human state, he is poor wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to poverty, that is to say, not to be a giver of food, drink, cloth, sandals, garlands, perfumes, unguents, bed, roof and lighting to monks and brahmans.

  10. "But here some woman or man is a giver of food, drink, cloth, sandals, perfumes, unguents, bed, roof and lighting to monks and brahmans. Due to having performed and completed such kamma, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a happy destination... If instead he comes to the human state, he is rich wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to riches, that is to say, to be a giver of food, drink, cloth, sandals, garlands, perfumes, unguents, bed, roof and lighting to monks and brahmans.

  11. "Here, student, some woman or man is obdurate and haughty; he does not pay homage to whom he should pay homage, or rise up for whom he should rise up, or give a seat to whom he should give a seat, or make way for whom he should make way, or worship him who should be worshipped, or respect him who should be respected, or revere him who should be revered, or honor him who should be honored. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a state of deprivation... If instead he comes to the human state, he is low-born wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to low birth, that is to say, to be obdurate and haughty, not to pay homage to whom he should pay homage, nor rise up for..., nor give a seat to..., nor make way for..., nor worship..., nor respect..., nor revere..., nor honor him who should be honored.

  12. "But here some woman or man is not obdurate or haughty; he pays homage to whom he should pay homage, rises up for whom he should rise up, gives a seat to whom he should give a seat, makes way for whom he should make way, worships him who should be worshipped, respects him who should be respected, reveres him who should be revered, honors him who should be honored. Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a happy destination... If instead he comes to the human state, he is high-born wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to high birth, that is to say, not to be obdurate or haughty, to pay homage to whom he should pay homage, to rise up for..., to give a seat to..., to make way for..., to worship... respect... revere... honor him who should be honored.

  13. "Here, student, some woman or man when visiting a monk or brahman, does not ask: 'What is wholesome, venerable sir? What is unwholesome? What is blamable? What is blameless? What should be cultivated? What should not be cultivated? What, by my doing it, will be long for my harm and suffering? Or what, by my doing it, will be long for my welfare and happiness?' Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a state of deprivation... If instead he comes to the human state, he will be stupid wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to stupidity, that is to say, when visiting a monk or brahman, not to ask: 'What is wholesome?... Or what, by my doing it, will be long for my welfare and happiness?'

  14. "But here some woman or man when visiting a monk or brahman, asks: 'What is wholesome, venerable sir?... Or what, by my doing it, will be long for my welfare and happiness?' Due to having performed and completed such kammas, on the dissolution of the body, after death, he reappears in a happy destination... If instead he comes to the human state, he is wise wherever he is reborn. This is the way that leads to wisdom, that is to say, when visiting a monk or brahman, to ask: 'What is wholesome, venerable sir?... Or what, by my doing it, will be long for my welfare and happiness?'

  15. "So, student, the way that leads to short life makes people short-lived, the way that leads to long life makes people long-lived; the way that leads to sickness makes people sick, the way that leads to health makes people healthy; the way that leads to ugliness makes people ugly, the way that leads to beauty makes people beautiful; the way that leads to insignificance makes people insignificant, the way that leads to influence makes people influential; the way that leads to poverty makes people poor, the way that leads to riches makes people rich; the way that leads to low birth makes people low-born, the way that leads to high birth makes people high-born; the way that leads to stupidity makes people stupid, the way that leads to wisdom makes people wise.

  16. "Beings are owners of kammas, student, heirs of kammas, they have kammas as their progenitor, kammas as their kin, kammas as their homing-place. It is kammas that differentiate beings according to inferiority and superiority."

  17. When this was said, Subha the student, Todeyya's son, said to the Blessed One: "Magnificent, Master Gotama! Magnificent, Master Gotama! The Dhamma has been made clear in many ways by Master Gotama, as though he were turning upright what had been overthrown, revealing the hidden, showing the way to one who is lost, holding up a lamp in the darkness for those with eyes to see forms.

  18. "I go to Master Gotama for refuge, and to the Dhamma and to the Sangha of bhikkhus. From today let Master Gotama accept me as a lay follower who has gone to him for refuge for life."

submitted by Betadance
[link] [4 comments]

Schools of Tibetan Buddhism

August 19, 2014 - 5:13pm

What do you folks think of the "nirvana fallacy"?

August 19, 2014 - 1:45pm

I ran across this concept of the Nirvana fallacy randomly today. The concept itself seems alright, the idea that the perfectionism gets in the way of making progress towards useful goals. Example:

Posit (fallacious) Seat belts are a bad idea. People are still going to die in car crashes.

Rebuttal While seat belts cannot make driving 100% safe, they do reduce one's likelihood of dying in a car crash.

However it seems funny to me that Nirvana is used to describe the perfect unrealizable ideal. The whole point of Buddhist practice is that it will get you towards an end to suffering or at least help you make some progress towards it. What do you think about this idea of a Nirvana fallacy?

submitted by not-typing
[link] [10 comments]

A change occured, and I don't know exactly what it is.

August 19, 2014 - 11:40am

This Sunday, before going to sleep I meditated lying down. Thought it might give me a relaxed sleep. I suppose I fell asleep while meditating. I woke suddenly feeling completly different, feeling my body differently. At that moment it felt like something broke away from me, and there is a knowing that there is no way of going back to the way I perceived the world before the experience. I felt/feel, not sure if alienated is the right word, to how I was before. It seems I see more of the world but it is more on the lines of just seeing, hearing, touching, moving.

I meditate more easily, stay for prolonged time concentrated and if it happens that I become distracted I notice it quite easily and come back, but not only in meditation, throughout everything I just get back if there is a distraction.

I'm not sure about emotions, I do seem a lot calmer. I think I'm just unsure about what happened, not worried. There is also a continuing tingling sensation above my head.

My question is: What happened? What changed?

submitted by alinu
[link] [7 comments]

Thought on paranormal phenomenon

August 19, 2014 - 11:39am

I just started reading on /r/paranormal , what are your thoughts on this as a person who has interest in Buddhism. Also, is there any connection of paranormal phenomenon to Buddhism ( as in demon possessed, reincarnation... )

submitted by redral
[link] [22 comments]

If Buddhists believe that life is suffering, doesn't it follow that they should be antinatalists?

August 19, 2014 - 10:00am

Buddhists are all about kindness and caring, so if they believe that life is suffering, wouldn't it make sense for them to not bring more people into a life of suffering?

submitted by packnaut
[link] [44 comments]